What You Need to Know About Traumatic Brain Injuries

A traumatic brain injury can have very serious effects on the human body. Considering that the brain plays an important role in regulating particular bodily functions, any type of external force to the head can cause significant damage and be considered a great cause for alarm.

The severity of a traumatic brain injury will depend on the amount of force that disrupts the brain. Any type of violent jolt or blow to the head could lead to significant dysfunction in the affected area of the brain. Sometimes, these dysfunctions are only temporary. However, more severe injuries could lead to permanent damage resulting in long-term complications or even death.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are about 1.4 million cases of traumatic brain injuries in the country every year. Minor injuries can result in bleeding, bruising, and torn tissues that could lead to short-term symptoms such as headaches, loss of consciousness, disorientation, and sensory problems. In more severe cases, a traumatic brain injury can lead to a patient experiencing permanent disability or falling into a coma.

Traumatic brain injuries usually result from the following situations: vehicular accidents, slipping or falling, physical assault, blasts or explosions, and any other incident that might cause a strong force to head.

Following an accident, patients might not be able to observe obvious and immediate signs of their injury. They might even walk away from an accident feeling fine. Even then, it’s important that patients at risk of a traumatic brain injury receive medical attention right away.

Anyone who has been in an accident that may have caused a strong blow to the head should be on the lookout for any evidence of significant injury. According the Mayo Clinic, traumatic brain injuries can lead to the following signs and symptoms:

  • Feeling dazed, disoriented, or confused
  • Losing consciousness for any amount of time
  • Headaches, nausea, or vomiting
  • Feeling fatigued, drowsy, or dizzy
  • Loss of balance and coordination
  • Problems with vision, hearing, smelling, and tasting+
  • Dilation of one or both pupils
  • Clear fluid draining from nose or ears
  • Weakness or numbness in fingers and toes
  • Convulsions or seizures
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